I need a place to dump my tabs so it doesn't clog my browser.

As of right now this is just a much needed extra brain, and may turn into something more later.

Probably not...
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from mattfractionblog  202 notes

cinephilearchive:

Max Tohline is back with a shot-by-shot investigation of the three-way standoff at the climax of Sergio Leone's ‘The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly,’ revealing mathematical patterns, images of thought, and pure musical rhythm. Dedicated to the editors, Eugenio Alabiso and Nino Baragli.

Rarely seen photos from ‘The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly’ courtesy of Jordan Krug.

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Reblogged from wrathschildfink  372 notes
heidisaman:

"I didn’t start making films until I was 34. But that wasted youth was probably the most valuable asset for what I’m doing now. You see the world, you end up in jail three or four times, you accumulate experience. And it gives you something to say. If you don’t have anything to say then you shouldn’t be making films. It’s nothing to do with what lens you’re using."
— Christopher Doyle on becoming a cinematographer
Still from In the Mood for Love (2000, dir. Wong Kar-wai) Cinematography by Christopher Doyle

heidisaman:

"I didn’t start making films until I was 34. But that wasted youth was probably the most valuable asset for what I’m doing now. You see the world, you end up in jail three or four times, you accumulate experience. And it gives you something to say. If you don’t have anything to say then you shouldn’t be making films. It’s nothing to do with what lens you’re using."

— Christopher Doyle on becoming a cinematographer

Still from In the Mood for Love (2000, dir. Wong Kar-wai) Cinematography by Christopher Doyle